Tag Archives: diversity

Santa Ban Prompts County to Consider De-Funding Head Start

"This may affect my willingness to fund money for them," said Supervisor Bill Russell. "That's just the way I am."

"This may affect my willingness to fund money for them," said Supervisor Bill Russell. "That's just the way I am."

A local Mississippi Head Start program that enforced a ban on Santa Claus from visiting children last month is now at risk of losing funding in the upcoming year. Concerned members of DeSoto County’s Board of Supervisors say the ban conflicts with Head Start’s “set of core values which … respects families, cultures and diversity.”

Prior to Christmas, a memo from Head Start state headquarters in Holly Springs implored employees in the program’s 367 pre-school centers to refrain from displaying Santa Claus and Christmas-themed decorations. Specifically, Head Start’s Virda Lee warned, “Please DO NOT invite Santa to your center.”

A “Winter Wonderland” theme featuring snowmen and snowflakes, however, was suggested by Lee as a suitable alternative during the season otherwise known as ‘Christmas.’

While Christmas was shunned in the name of promoting ‘tolerance’ and ‘diversity’ to Head Start’s young participants, it was revealed by Gov. Haley Barbour’s spokesman this week that the ban on all things Christmas appears to be the handiwork of a naughty elf, aka Virda Lee, because it’s definitely not the “official position” of the statewide program.

DeSoto County’s Board of Supervisors said they want answers from Head Start regarding its official position on Christmas before making critical funding decisions later this month.

“We have an American culture, and every time we turn around it gets chipped away and chipped away, and I’m getting tired of it,” said Supervisor Allen Latimer.

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Pro-Christmas Activist Wages War Against School District Grinches

"The Grinch that Stole Christmas isn't just a book and movie," says Brannon. "In many public schools, Christmas as we know it has been eradicated; erased – gone – eliminated."

"The Grinch that Stole Christmas isn't just a book and movie," says Brannon. "In many public schools, Christmas as we know it has been eradicated; erased – gone – eliminated."

When a public school district in Maine informed parents last month that “West African chants” would replace traditional ‘holiday’ songs during its annual “Winter General Music Festival,” one concerned father felt compelled to steal Christmas back from the Grinch.

According to Matthew Brannon, Maine School Administrative District #75 (MSAD 75) recently revised its ‘Holiday Policy‘ with the intent to promote “diversity” and “inclusiveness.” As a result, he says, the school board has “marginalize[d] our values.”

In an urgent effort to inform fellow parents “about what the [G]rinchs in our school system are doing to steal Christmas from our children – and to do something about it,” Brannon launched StolenChristmas.org. “Their policy requires diversity. To them that means every culture except American,” he says.

Thanks to Brannon’s wrestling with district administrators, ‘Jingle Bells’ was sung by children during the recent ‘music festival,’ but he noted that it was “such a last minute addition it never made it into the printed program. The kids had spent weeks practicing their African chants.”

Despite the district’s attempt to appease and, perhaps, silence a vocal and outraged Brannon with a single non-controversial holiday song, he remains committed to ensuring that “teaching and celebrating our traditional holidays” is not erased from the blackboard, silenced in the choir or eliminated from discussion in the classroom. He’s even proposed a revision to the already revised ‘Holiday Policy’ and is hoping district administrators will consider it during a future meeting.

“If this effort to marginalize our values angers you as much as it angers me, help me reverse this trend,” Brannon says. “Contact the MSAD 75 Superintendent of Schools, contact the Principals, contact the school board members. Let them know how you feel about their lack-of-Christmas Holiday Policy and demand that it be changed.”

If you share Brannon’s sentiments — “I’M MAD AS HELL about it and I’m not going to take it anymore” — contact MSAD 75 officials and let them know there’s more than one parent who will not tolerate the systematic eradication of Christmas by big government bureaucrats.

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‘Christmas’ Is the New ‘C-Word’

Get this slogan on a t-shirt at ChristianShirts.net

Get this slogan on a t-shirt at ChristianShirts.net

FOX News reports that NPR’s Nina Totenberg apologized on-air this past weekend for potentially offending her audience by using the term “Christmas party” to describe an event she recently attended:

NPR’s Nina Totenberg suggests that using the word “Christmas” to describe all those winter-weather parties is somehow inappropriate, as she excused herself over the weekend for using it during an on-air discussion.

The peculiar remark came as Totenberg was making a point about the budget. She asked her fellow panelists to “forgive the expression” when she mentioned a Christmas party she attended.

“I want to say one thing about the budget that didn’t get passed, the omnibus bill. You know, we talk a lot about — we just passed this huge tax cut in part because business said, you know, we have to plan, we have to know what kind of tax cuts we have. Well, these agencies, including the Defense Department, don’t know how much money they’ve got and for what,” she said. “And I was at — forgive the expression — a Christmas party at the Department of Justice and people actually (were) really worried about this.”

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‘Tis the Season for Mandatory Kwanzaa in the Classroom

The Afro-centric 'holiday,' Kwanzaa, has become a sacred annual tradition that public schools are forcing kids of all races to celebrate and embrace, in the name of teaching 'tolerance' and 'diversity,' of course.

The Afro-centric 'holiday,' Kwanzaa, has become a sacred annual tradition that public schools are forcing kids of all races to celebrate and embrace, in the name of teaching 'tolerance' and 'diversity,' of course.

Yesterday, the Nanny State Liberation Front reported that Head Start classes in Minn. banned Santa Claus from visiting because he makes “immigrant” students feel ‘uncomfortable.’ Ironically, forcing school children of all races to “meditate on the awesome meaning of being African in the world” has become a sacred annual tradition in public schools across the nation.

Children at Falk Elementary School in Madison, Wisc., are currently being instructed to celebrate the seven principles of Kwanzaa, whether they or their parents like it or not. Although thirty-percent of the student population is white, teacher Kira Fobbs claims, “All the [Kwanzaa] principles we’re celebrating and teaching every day are universal.”

“Universal?” Tell that to Kwanzaa inventor Ron Karenga. He recently educated students at N.C. Central University on the principles of his ‘holiday,’ confirming that its message and target audience are anything but universal or diverse:

“We have the most ancient history in the world,” Karenga told students at the nation’s first public liberal arts college founded for African-Americans. “[Kwanzaa is a time] to meditate on the awesome meaning of being African in the world.”

Despite the Karenga’s own admission that his ‘holiday‘ is narrowly focused on celebrating African culture and heritage, Falk Elementary School teachers, ninety-four percent of which are white, say they incorporate the seven principles of Kwanzaa into lesson plans every day:

They form a circle as they dance, clap and chant in unison to a song about freedom. When the music ends, the children chatter with fresh energy for a moment, until teacher Kira Fobbs walks slowly to the center, demanding silence with her stare.

“I am somebody,” she calls out.

“I am somebody!” the students respond.

“I am capable and lovable,” she says and they repeat. “I am teachable.” “Therefore I can learn.” “I can do anything if I try.” “I’ll be the best that I can be …”

After the crescendo of affirmations, the students recite the Nguzo Saba, the seven principles of Kwanzaa: Umoja (unity), Kujichagulia (self-determination), Ujima (collective work and responsibility), Ujamaa (cooperative economics), Nia (purpose), Kuumba (creativity) and Imani (faith).

Finally the students at the school on Madison’s Southwest Side break into four groups, each named after an African tribe, and head to classrooms where they pursue projects and activities focused on the principles.

In the Ujaama classroom, student hear a folk tale about sharing, then paint penny banks to collect money for a library in Ghana. In the Ujima classroom, they work on a blanket and cards for the American Family Children’s Hospital. In the Imani group, students listen to a rap song by LL Cool J about never giving up.

Yet, when a minority of immigrant students complain about Santa Claus making them feel ‘uncomfortable’ because he is not part of their cultures or faiths, the public school system bends over backwards to make the majority shun their own cultural and religious traditions — for the sake of ‘diversity’ and ‘tolerance,’ of course.

Nowadays, all that remains in public school classrooms across the nation are images of snowmen, fir trees and wreaths during the so-called “Holiday Season” formerly known as “Christmas.” Thanks to Kwanzaa, school children can recite African chants and songs while affirming the principles of a cultural and ethnic ‘tradition’ that, for many, has absolutely no relevance or meaning to themselves and their families’ own cultural and ethnic heritage.

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Diversity ‘Exercises’ Replace Competitive Games in Gym Class

This clown is juggling scarves. Guess what? This passes as "exercise" in gym class these days!

This clown is juggling scarves. Guess what? This passes as "exercise" in gym class these days!

Team sports will no longer be encouraged in the District of Columbia’s public schools during gym class as “competition” has been deemed an obstacle to children struggling with the reality that none of them have been created equal in size, skill or ability. Instead of playing competitive games like soccer, basketball and baseball, kids will stand alone jumping rope, gyrating with hula hoops, dancing, juggling scarves and, most importantly, learning how to embrace diversity.

“The trend is to move away from competitiveness,” says Donald Hawkins who teaches students as young as 3- and 4-years-old at Browne Education Campus in Northeast DC. “We are focusing on the skills, not so much as the games. The winners of the games are not important,” he told The Washington Post.

Providing the encouragement for schools across the nation to eliminate team sports and competition from gym class is the Carol M. White Physical Education Program (PEP) that awards “millions of dollars” in federal grant money to schools and “community-based organizations” seeking to change the way kids play together. Hawkins’ anti-competition curriculum arrives courtesy of $1.5 million in grant money that has been awarded to the D.C. public school system over the next three years.

Recipients of PEP grants like the DC public school system are adopting a series of suggested gym class curriculum for schools to incorporate in physical education lessons through the SPARK (Sports, Play, and Active Recreation for Kids) program. Children in grades K-8 are subjected to various activities that promote “active situations for social interaction and personal meaning” under SPARK’s physical education guidelines.

Included in the “SPARK K-2 PE Curriculum” are instructions for gym teachers to engage kids in activities that promote and establish:

  • “good feelings;”
  • “Specific lessons that address respect for individual differences within and outside of physical education as well as the importance of engaging with individuals with disabilities and/or special health care needs;”
  • “Specific lessons that address the role of physical activity throughout history (e.g., the role physical activity and games played in different cultures);”
  • “Specific lessons that allow students to express their feelings toward physical activity;” and
  • “Protocols for assessing personal and social respect regarding individual differences within and outside of physical education;”

The “SPARK 3-6 PE Curriculum” adds:

  • “Specific lessons about teaching students ways to engage students with disabilities and respect peers from different cultural backgrounds;”
  • “Specific lessons about the role of physical activity in dance and artistic movement throughout history and in different cultures,” noting, “The SPARK Dance unit includes cultural dances. Several Dances in this unit include Social Studies Academic Integrations such as Geographical History, Culture, and American History;”
  • “Specific lessons that teach students the differences between personal challenges and competition and provide the opportunity for students to choose at least one personally challenging physical activity to attempt;”
  • “Protocols for assessing students’ knowledge about physical activity opportunities outside of physical education class, such as asking students to create a written report about physical activity options in the community or after school;”
  • “Protocols for assessing students’ ability to conduct self-assessment and initiate self-improvement for physical activity and fitness, such as having students complete a fitness test (e.g., Fitnessgram), identify strengths and weaknesses, and discuss ways to improve their fitness;”
  • “Protocols for analyzing students’ personal and social respect regarding individual differences within physical education, such as observing students’ social behavior during class;” and
  • “Protocols that ask students to identify and explain the importance of self expression through movement, such as asking students to explain certain types of physical activity that are artistic in nature.”
Politically correct crayons should help kids flex their diversity muscles in the class formerly known as "Physical Education."

Politically correct crayons should help kids flex their diversity muscles in the class formerly known as "Physical Education."

The “SPARK Middle School PE Curriculum” incorporates all of the above activities and protocols while adding diversity ‘exercises’ to the mix with its “World Games Unit” that is designed to help kids “reflect the perspectives, diversity, and needs among students, families, and the community.”

Specifically, the World Games Unit encourages gym teachers to promote:

Learning games and traditions from other cultures can be an enlightening experience with the potential to foster respect and other socially responsible behaviors that can last a lifetime. Many modern countries are multicultural in composition, with a blend of various traditions and values all within the able for students to recognize and respect diverse aspects of their communities so that all of its citizens are able to contribute in a meaningful way. Therefore, Multicultural Education teaches students about the diversity found in the local and national community.

Likewise, Global Education teaches students about the diversity found at an international level. Students benefit by experiencing global diversity in a physical activity setting in order to foster respect for traditions and cultures that they may not otherwise discover around them. This unit can be used asa blend of both Multicultural and Global Education and is aligned with NASPE and state content and performance standards. Students may already know and love some of the games and activities found in this unit. They may be experiencing others for the first time. Encourage students to explore their own communities for more multicultural ideas and challenge them to search the globe for games that keep the world healthy and active.

“This is Hawkins’s health and physical education class, but it’s not the PE that these preschoolers’ parents probably remember,” The Washington Post notes. “The days of students fretting over being the last one picked during volleyball or the first one tagged in dodge ball are fading in many D.C. area schools as physical education classes, such as this one, focus more on individual fitness, personal growth and development.”

Playing alone, subjecting kids to humiliating fat-measuring tests, encouraging “good feelings,” dancing to global beats, exploring the artistic nature and historic value of play, and embracing diversity for the sake of diversity — that is the future of physical education in public schools across America. Rejecting competition as an unnecessary evil and extolling the virtues of socialism will guarantee a level playing field in every aspect of children’s lives, or so the proponents of the SPARK program insist.

Gone are the days of encouraging kids to practice, work hard, excel and achieve goals as individuals and teammates. Children as young as 3-years-old are now being taught that victory is for losers, and losing is the result of unfair bullying by kids who take competition too seriously.

If you’re tired of big government bureaucrats manipulating the education system to promote their socialist agenda among impressionable young minds, join the Nanny State Liberation Front as we launch a revolution to protect and promote freedom and American exceptionalism as our nation’s Founding Father’s intended.