Tag Archives: housing market

NSLF’s Top 10 Least Wanted in the U.S. House

Editor’s Note: Candidates appear in no particular order.

Nancy left her heart in San Francisco and brought back a souvenir from the Folsom Street Fair.

Nancy left her heart in San Francisco and brought back a souvenir from the Folsom Street Fair.

1. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif. | CD 8) – Not content with allowing Americans to even sample the health care bill before shoving it down their throats, Pelosi told us, “[W]e have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it, away from the fog of the controversy.” That so-called “fog” and “controversy” were citizens demanding transparency and accountability from Pelosi – and, by her account, we were simply asking too much. It’s time to revoke Pelosi’s license to prescribe cradle-to-the-grave entitlements that the majority of Americans do not want.

"Freddie who? Fannie what?"

"Freddie who? Fannie what?"

2. Barney Frank (D-Mass. | CD 4) – When revelations began coming to light in 2003 that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were going to cause the housing bubble to burst, Frank adamantly defended his longstanding belief that home ownership is a ‘God-given right’ for all Americans, even if they were unemployed or couldn’t afford their mortgages. “These two entities — Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac — are not facing any kind of financial crisis,” he told The New York Times on Sept. 11, 2003. ”The more people exaggerate these problems, the more pressure there is on these companies, the less we will see in terms of affordable housing.” Flash-forward to 2009 when the bubble blew-up in his face, and we see Frank calling for the prosecution of those who caused the housing meltdown. Got hypocrisy? Better yet, got a mirror?

"Bilge Pump" Betsey celebrates her 19th bailout vote.

"Bilge Pump" Betsey celebrates her 19th bailout vote.

3. Betsey Markey (D-Colo. | CD 4) – Promoting herself as an anti-big government Blue Dog Democrat, Markey has marched lockstep with Speaker Pelosi in voting for 19 bailouts costing taxpayers “trillions in deficit spending.” Ironically, back home in her district, she’s been running ads telling voters Wall Street bailouts “really offend” her: “Bailout is just another word for cop-out … And here in Colorado, that’s not how we do business,” she says in one TV ad.

Concise and to the point.

Concise and to the point.

4. Chris Smith (R-N.J. | CD 4) – Smith, a 14-term incumbent, rode in to Congress on the coattails of Ronald Reagan in 1980 and should be ushered out on Speaker Pelosi’s broom on Nov. 2. When he’s not voting to tax the air we breathe and gases we release, Smith’s padding his pockets with big labor union money, most likely in exchange for the nearly $24 million in earmarks he’s made to contributors in FY 2010.

How about we join together and vote you out of office?

How about we join together and vote you out of office?

5. Carol Shea-Porter (D-N.H. | CD 1) – During a candidate forum on Sept. 27, the incumbent informed voters that no corporation should be “too big to fail,” then touted her support for the nearly $20 billion bailout of General Motors. Pressed to identify at least one small business that she has assisted during her 2 terms in office, she refused, citing “privacy concerns.” Folks, this is our money and she can’t refuse to tell us how it’s being used or misused.

Bill took half of the girls profits.

Bill took half of the girls profits.

6. Bill Keating (D-Mass. | CD 10 [OPEN SEAT]) – A few short months ago, Keating opposed a wind farm project that would cost taxpayers billions, but once his primary race started heating-up, he changed his position. Now, Keating has the endorsement of the state’s leading labor unions that smell a big payday ‘blowing in the wind.’ That’s just the cost of doing business with big government bureaucrats like Keating. On Nov. 2, make sure you’re not held responsible for repaying Keating’s favors to the Massachusetts AFL-CIO and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 103.

John skips the teleprompter and just lets Nancy Pelosi whisper in his ears.

John skips the teleprompter and just lets Nancy Pelosi whisper in his ears.

7. John Boccieri (D-Ohio | CD 16) – This cold-hearted coal country Democrat supported the National Energy Tax that’s poised to kill 100,000 jobs in Ohio alone, then he leant his signature to the HIRE Act that does little, if anything, to reduce the state’s 9.7 percent unemployment rate. And, these are just two examples of Boccieri following Speaker Pelosi’s marching orders.

As always, Nancy leads her lapdog, Stenny.

As always, Nancy leads her lapdog, Stenny.

8. Steny Hoyer (D-Md. | CD 5) – Hoyer, a 15-term incumbent and Speaker Pelosi’s chief lapdog, believes that the Constitution allows big government bureaucrats the right to do whatever they please, so long as actions are made in the spirit of promoting “the general welfare.” And, when it comes to forcing Americans to purchase so-called “affordable” healthcare, Hoyer says, “I think clearly this is within our constitutional responsibility.”

Upton's so environmentally friendly that he just rolls to work in a tire.

Upton's so environmentally friendly that he just rolls to work in a tire.

9. Fred Upton (R-Mich. | CD 6) – This RINO has cast way too many votes enabling Speaker Pelosi and her boss, President Obama, to bankrupt America by any means necessary. On top of that, Upton’s an environmental wingnut who Democrats say is “someone they can work with on energy and climate issues.” Thanks to Fred and his friends across the aisle, beginning in 2012, old-fashioned light bulbs will be phased-out and replaced with those super-expensive ‘energy-efficient’ bulbs. Despite co-sponsoring the light bulb ban, Upton’s now trying to downplay his involvement the bill’s passage.

Tom's displays his ability to screw with ease.

Tom's displays his ability to screw with ease.

10. Tom Perriello (D-Va. | CD 5) —  The very same economic crash that left 10,000 citizens in Virginia’s 5th congressional district unemployed is what Perriello credits for carrying him to victory in 2008. Over the course of his first term in office, Perriello has talked a big game about putting people in his district back to work, but the only firm numbers he can offer are based on promises and speculation from businesses that are either under construction or yet to be built. “Instant gratification,” he tells jobless voters, “is part of what got us into this place.”

Don’t see a candidate listed? Spotlight the offender of freedom and liberty on our Facebook page’s Wall or Twitter page.

View NSLF’s additional “Top 10 Least Wanted” lists:

1. U.S. Senate (Oct. 27)
2. Governor (Oct. 28)
3. State and Local Government (Nov. 1)

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Selling Your Home? Beware of Greedy Bureaucrats

Selling a home isn't as easy as it used to be, thanks to a big government scheme that punishes sellers before they even put 'For Sale' signs on their front lawns.

Selling a home isn't as easy as it used to be, thanks to a big government scheme that punishes sellers before they even put 'For Sale' signs on their front lawns.

Times are tough for homeowners seeking to cut their losses and move on to a new home, and greedy bureaucrats in some cash-strapped municipalities are trying to cash-in before sellers move out. Increasingly, local governments are mandating that sellers submit to pre-sale residential home inspections that bureaucrats in at least one city readily admit “are not for the benefit of buyer or seller.”

BigGovernment.com’s Tom Steward reports that at least fourteen municipalities in Minnesota’s Twin Cities have passed ordinances requiring sellers to pass rigorous home inspections conducted by city-paid inspectors to find potential code violations. The inspections cost homeowners $50 to $200, with all proceeds benefiting local governments.

On its website, Steward notes, the City of Richfield states “inspections are not for the benefit of buyer or seller, but are a community effort to maintain the quality of Richfield’s houses and neighborhoods.” Homeowners intending to list their homes as ‘handyman specials’ will be shocked to learn that code violations cited by Richfield inspectors include “bare wood, peeling paint, missing or deteriorated window glazing, and clogged gutters,” forcing sellers to invest in repairs they’d otherwise leave as-is.

Homeowners in the Minneapolis suburb of Brooklyn Park who take their homes off the market or find their homes are not attracting buyers are still obligated by city law to correct code violations. City officials remain intent on citing homeowners who are staying put with “property deficiencies” that must be remedied immediately.

The city’s “Point of Sale Inspection Program” webpage explains, “This program is designed as a public service to help maintain property within the City of Brooklyn Park.” So if you’re planning on selling a home in Brooklyn Park, make sure you’re going to follow through with the sale or at least have money in the bank to make repairs if you reconsider.

Brooklyn Park Community Development Director Robert Schreier doesn’t seem to grasp the concept that unless they’re new construction, homes are ‘used’ and often require minor to extensive repairs by buyers upon purchase. Some homebuyers purchase ‘handyman specials’ because of the great deals on fixer-upper homes being sold at a fraction of the cost of neighboring homes, which for many, is an incentive — not a disincentive — to buy these homes that stand to fail absurd pre-sale city inspections.

Despite this logic, Schreier says the pre-sale inspections are “providing a service to the community. We never hear complaints from people buying the houses. The people that are moving in are glad for the inspections.” Note that he has no concern for the seller and the inconvenience posed by pre-sale inspection requirements. And, that’s because without the mandatory inspections, his city won’t pull-in free money generated by this revenue-generating scheme.

“I don’t think it’s accurate if you want to talk about too much government,” Schreier added with regards to the insinuation that Brooklyn Park is butting its nose in a place it doesn’t belong.

Ever heard of local governments pulling this stunt outside of Minnesota or in your neck of the woods? Help us shed light on greedy bureaucrats who are exploiting homeowners already struggling to sell their homes in our lousy economy.

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